Who calls for an emergency meeting because more than 3,200 cases of Monkeypox are confirmed

Who calls for an emergency meeting because more than 3,200 cases of Monkeypox are confirmed

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More than 3,200 cases of Monkeypox were confirmed and one death was reported to the world health organization as part of the current outbreak.
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More than 3,200 cases of Monkeypox have confirmed and one was reported to the World Health Organization as part of the current epidemic.

Key points: the director general of the WHO said that the transmission of the person to the virus was underway and was probably underestimated

The director general of the WHO said that the transmission of the person to the virus was underway and was probably underestimated so far, 48 countries have reported cases in the current epidemic that started in May

Until now, 48 countries have reported cases in the current epidemic that started in May, WHO has not yet decided to declare Monkeypox a global emergency of health

On Thursday, the director general of WHO, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said that he needed intensified surveillance in the wider community.

He added that cases in non -endemic countries were still mainly in men who have sex with men.

"Transmission from person to person is underway and is probably underestimated," said Dr. Tedros at a meeting of the Emergency Committee for International Health Regulations.

The meeting of experts was summoned by the WHO to decide to declare MonkeyPox a global emergency in terms of health, however, the organization said that it did not expect to announce decisions taken by its emergency committee before Friday.

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A "public health emergency of international concern" is which is the highest level of alert.

Declaring Monkeypox is a global emergency would mean that the United Nations health agency considers that the epidemic is an "extraordinary event" and that the disease is likely to spread even more borders, perhaps requiring a global response.

This would also give Monkeypox the same distinction as the COVVI-19 pandemic and the continuous effort to eradicate polio.

Many scientists doubt that such a declaration would help limit the epidemic, because the developed countries recording the most recent cases already move quickly to stop it.

So far, 48 countries have reported cases in the current epidemic, which started in May.

Monkeypox hurts decades for decades in Central Africa and West Africa, where a version of the disease is up to 10% of infected people.

The version of the disease observed in Europe and elsewhere generally has a mortality rate of less than 1% and no African has been reported so far.

There had been nearly 1,500 suspect cases of Monkeypox this year in Central Africa and 70 s, said Dr. Tedros.

The WHO Head called on Member States to share information on the virus because it would help the