Friday Morning Medical Update: The AIDS Walk and Other WaysYou Can Help The Community

Friday Morning Medical Update: The AIDS Walk and Other WaysYou Can Help The Community

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The University of Kansas Health System is treating a total of 19 COVID patients today, down from 17 yesterday. Other significant numbers:
10 with the active virus today, 6 yesterday
2 in ICU, 1 yesterday
0 on ventilator, same as yesterday
19 hospitalized but out of acute infection phase, 17 yesterday
Key points from today’s guests:

Dr. Nathan Bahr, infectious diseases, The University of Kansas Health System

COVID has had an impact on AIDS cases, as many missed treatments or were hesitant to seek screening
If you’ve ever had sex without protection you should get screened
There are excellent treatments now that were not available when HIV was discovered 40 years ago
Patients can live very normal lives with proper medication
Dr. Wissam El Atrouni, infectious diseases, The University of Kansas Health System

There are home tests for HIV, similar to home COVID tests. A positive result needs to be confirmed with a doctor
About 3,000 people are infected each year in the U.S., mostly in the 24-34 age group, but it affects all age groups
Women going through pre-pregnancy evaluation or pregnancy treatment should be tested
There is still no cure or vaccine for HIV, only treatments
Kimberly Carson, Vice President for Education and Outreach at AIDS Services Foundation of Kansas City

Everybody should be tested for HIV once in their lifetime, even if they’re at low risk
Her group focuses on address the stigma of HIV
Annual AIDS Walk is tomorrow at 10 starting at Theis Park near the Plaza.
Money raised helps support AIDS services in the community
Bridgit Patterson, Program Director, Epilepsy Foundation, Kansas City

Epilepsy is a neurological condition that is characterized by two or more unprovoked seizures.
It can come at any point in a person’s lifetime
Her son was diagnosed with epilepsy 17 years ago
Epilepsy Gala tomorrow night raises awareness and money to serve communities throughout Missouri and Kansas. Tickets still available.
Dr. Dana Hawkinson, medical director of Infection Prevention and Control, The University of Kansas Health System

Of current COVID patients in the hospital, half are here just for COVID, the others were here for something else and diagnosed with the virus
Childhood vaccinations have declined during the pandemic, which could be leading to new cases of the measles

Monday, May 2 at 8:00 a.m. is the next Morning Medical Update. We track the looming BA.2 surge here in the metro, plus, the new variants showing up overseas sparking concern.